2016 BAHFest London Keynote from Jen Gupta

3rd Annual BAHFest London

BAHFest is a celebration of well-argued and thoroughly researched but completely incorrect scientific theory. Our brave speakers present their bad theories in front of a live audience and a panel of judges with real science credentials, who together determine who takes home the coveted BAHFest trophy. And eternal glory, of course.

Tickets are now on sale!
Date: March 17, 2018
Time: 7:00PM
Location: Imperial College

Judges and Speakers

Matt Parker

Matt Parker

Host

Matt Parker, known as the Stand-Up Mathematician, is a former maths teacher who now works both as a stand-up comedian and a maths communicator. He appears regularly on TV and online: he presents on the Discovery Channel and his YouTube videos have been viewed over 50 million times.

Matt has toured both as part of the comedy group Festival of the Spoken Nerd and with Brian Cox, bringing mathematical rigour to Brian’s hand-wavy physics and becoming the first person to use an overhead projector on-stage at the Hammersmith Apollo since Pink Floyd.

Matt is also the Public Engagement in Maths Fellow at Queen Mary University of London and in his spare time wrote the book Things to Make And Do in the Fourth Dimension (Penguin, 2014).

Boulet

Boulet

Keynote speaker

Boulet is a french comic artist born in 1975, who studied comics and illustration in Strasbourg, at the Haute École des Arts du Rhin (HEAR).
He worked on several comic series for kids (Raghnarok, La Rubrique Scientifique with Glénat) and adults (Dungeon with NBM comics, the Blank Slate on Comixology). His most important work has been the webcomic “Bouletcorp.com” on which he published 2000+ pages since 2004. Most of it has been translated in english (english.bouletcorp.com) and the series “Notes” (11 volumes, with Delcourt) had its first volume translated and published by Soaring Penguin Press.

Lindsey Fitzharris

Lindsey Fitzharris

Judge

Lindsey Fitzharris is author of The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine. She received her doctorate in the history of science, medicine and technology at the University of Oxford, and was a post-doctoral research fellow at the Wellcome Institute. She is the writer and presenter of the YouTube series Under the Knife, and creator of the popular blog The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice. She is a purveyor of gruesome artefacts on Instagram (@DrLindseyFitzharris), Twitter (@DrLindseyFitz), Facebook (@DrLindseyFitzharris), and YouTube (@UnderTheKnife), and is a member of The Order of the Good Death.

Dr. Jennifer Gupta

Dr. Jennifer Gupta

Judge

Dr Jen Gupta is an astrophysicist, science communicator, presenter, and self-proclaimed space nerd. She is the creator and host of the Seldom Sirius astronomy podcast, and one of the presenters of the BBC’s Tomorrow’s World Live series on Facebook and YouTube. Her day job is at the University of Portsmouth where she works to engage the wider community with the cutting edge astrophysics research carried out at the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation.
Over the past nine years Jen’s science communication journey has found her lecturing in the Royal Institution’s iconic Faraday lecture theatre, performing astronomy-themed comedy at the Edinburgh Fringe, and giving talks at schools in India. Jen was a keynote speaker at BAHFest London 2016 where she solved all of the world’s problems using big data and puppies.
Tim Harford

Tim Harford

Judge

Tim Harford is a writer of popular economics books, Financial Times columnist and BBC broadcaster.

Tim is an economist, journalist and broadcaster who authored “Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy”, “Messy”, and the million-selling “The Undercover Economist”. Tim is a senior columnist at the Financial Times, and the presenter of Radio 4’s “More or Less” and the iTunes-topping series “Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy”. Tim has spoken at TED, PopTech and the Sydney Opera House. He is a visiting fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford and an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society.

Tim was Economics Commentator of the Year 2014, winner of the Royal Statistical Society journalistic excellence award 2015, won the Society of Business Economists writing prize 2014-15, and the Bastiat Prize for economic journalism in 2006 and 2016.

Sydney Padua

Sydney Padua

Judge

Sydney Padua is a cartoonist and visual effects artist. Her cult webcomic The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage is now a bestselling graphic novel and won the 2105 BSHM Neumann Prize for the history of mathematics.

Presenters

Shalaka Kurup

Shalaka Kurup

A PhD student and rice aficionado, Shalaka Kurup was asked to write her bio herself. She is also a three-time Oscar nominee, and the youngest person to scale the dizzying heights of Mount Kinabalu one-handed.   

Katherine Read

Katherine Read

Katherine is a medical student at Imperial College London. Her talk is not affiliated with, endorsed by, or in any way officially connected with her own beliefs.

Pietro Salvi

Pietro Salvi

Pietro is in his fourth year of physics at Imperial College, desperately searching for a PhD. He is confident that this presentation will help with that. His research for this year’s BAHFest has also granted him a place on a record number of FBI watchlists, and the reasons why should become apparent very shortly.

Daniel Shaw

Dan Shaw is a civil servant from Salisbury studying Maths and Physics with the Open University in his spare time, with a focus and interest in astrophysics.

Louie Terrill

Louie Terrill

Louie is studying for a Physics degree here at Imperial, in the hopes of legitimizing his plans for world optimization. This year, his proposal is a bit more down-to-earth, but only in the literal sense.

Ed Thorne

Ed Thorne

Ed is a writer and improviser. What he may lack in scientific knowledge, he also lacks in every other field of human knowledge too. After taking part in BAHfest in 2016 and 2017, he’s thrilled to be back here once more to share his ideas and collaborate, as he strongly believes there is no ‘I’ in ‘science’.